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IMO STCW 2010 Regulations - Guidance Regarding Special Training Requirements for Personnel on Certain Types of Ships

ship special training

In this section

STCW Code Section B-V/a*

Guidance regarding additional training for masters and chief mates of large ships and ships with unusual manoeuvring characteristics



  1. It is important that masters and chief mates should have had relevant experience and training before assuming the duties of master or chief mate of large ships or ships having unusual manoeuvring and handling characteristics significantly different from those in which they have recently served. Such characteristics will generally be found in ships which are of considerable deadweight or length or of special design or of high speed.
  2. Prior to their appointment to such a ship, masters and chief mates should:
    1. be informed of the ship’s handling characteristics by the company, particularly in relation to the knowledge, understanding and proficiency listed under ship manoeuvring and handling in column 2 of table A-II/2 Specification of the minimum standard of competence for masters and chief mates on ships of 500 gross tonnage or more; and
    2. be made thoroughly familiar with the use of all navigational and manoeuvring aids fitted in the ship concerned, including their capabilities and limitations.
  3. Before initially assuming command of one of the ships referred to above, the prospective master should have sufficient and appropriate general experience as master or chief mate, and either:
    1. have sufficient and appropriate experience manoeuvring the same ship under supervision or in manoeuvring a ship having similar manoeuvring characteristics; or
    2. have attended an approved ship handling simulator course on an installation capable of simulating the manoeuvring characteristics of such a ship. **
  4. The additional training and qualifications of masters and chief mates of dynamically supported and high-speed craft should be in accordance with the relevant guidelines of the IMO Code of Safety for Dynamically Supported Craft and the IMO International Codes of Safety for High-Speed Craft (1994 HSC Code and 2000 HSC Code), as appropriate.

STCW Section B-V/b*

Guidance regarding training of officers and ratings responsible for cargo handling on ships carrying dangerous and hazardous substances in solid form in bulk

  1. Training should be divided into two parts, a general part on the principles involved and a part on the application of such principles to ship operation. All training and instruction should be given by properly qualified and suitably experienced personnel and cover at least the subjects given in paragraphs 2 to 14 hereunder.

PRINCIPLES

Characteristics and properties

  1. The important physical characteristics and chemical properties of dangerous and hazardous substances, sufficient to give a basic understanding of the intrinsic hazards and risks involved.

Classification of materials possessing chemical hazards

  1. IMO dangerous goods classes 4 to 9 and the hazards associated with each class; and materials hazardous only in bulk (MHB) outlined in the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code.

Health hazards

  1. Dangers from skin contact, inhalation, ingestion and radiation.

Conventions, regulations and recommendations

  1. General familiarization with the relevant requirements of chapters II-2 and VII of the 1974 SOLAS Convention, as amended.
  2. General use of and familiarization with the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code, with particular reference to:
    1. safety of personnel, including safety equipment, measuring instruments, their use and practical application and interpretation of results;
    2. hazards from cargoes which have a tendency to shift; and
    3. materials possessing chemical hazards.

SHIPBOARD APPLICATION

Class 4.1 - Flammable solids

Class 4.2 - Substances liable to spontaneous combustion

Class 4.3 - Substances which, in contact with water, emit flammable gases

  1. Carriage, stowage and control of temperature to prevent decomposition and possible explosion; stowage categories; general stowage precautions, including those applicable to self-reactive and related substances; segregation requirements to prevent heating and ignition; the emission of poisonous or flammable gases and the formation of explosive mixtures.

Class 5.1 - Oxidizing substances

  1. Carriage, stowage and control of temperature to prevent decomposition and possible explosion; stowage categories; general stowage precautions and segregation requirements to ensure separation from combustible material, from acids and heat sources to prevent fire, explosion and the formation of toxic gases.

Class 6.1 - Toxic substances

  1. Contamination of foodstuffs, working areas and living accommodation and ventilation.

Class 7 - Radioactive material

  1. Transport index; types of ores and concentrates; stowage and segregation from persons, undeveloped photographic film and plates and foodstuffs; stowage categories; general stowage requirements; special stowage requirements; segregation requirements and separation distances; segregation from other dangerous goods.

Class 8 - Corrosive substances

  1. Dangers from wetted substances.

Class 9 - Miscellaneous dangerous substances and articles

  1. Examples and associated hazards; the hazards of materials hazardous only in bulk (IMSBC Code); general and specific stowage precautions; working and transport precautions; segregation requirements.

Safety precautions and emergency procedures

  1. Electrical safety in cargo spaces; precautions to be taken for entry into enclosed spaces that may contain oxygen-depleted, poisonous or flammable atmospheres; the possible effects of fire in shipments of substances of each class; use of the Emergency Response Procedures for Ships Carrying Dangerous Goods; emergency plans and procedures to be followed in case of incidents involving dangerous and hazardous substances and the use of individual entries in the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code, as appropriate, in this respect.

Medical first aid

  1. The IMO Medical First Aid Guide for Use in Accidents Involving Dangerous Goods (MFAG) and its use and application in association with other guides and medical advice by radio.

STCW Section B-V/c*

Guidance regarding training of officers and ratings responsible for cargo handling on ships carrying dangerous and hazardous substances in packaged form

  1. Training should be divided into two parts, a general part on the principles involved and a part on the application of such principles to ship operation. All training and instruction should be given by properly qualified and suitably experienced personnel and cover at least the subjects given in paragraphs 2 to 19 hereunder.

PRINCIPLES

Characteristics and properties

  1. The important physical characteristics and chemical properties of dangerous and hazardous substances, sufficient to give a basic understanding of the intrinsic hazards and risks involved.

Classification of dangerous and hazardous substances and materials possessing chemical hazards

  1. IMO dangerous goods classes 1 to 9 and the hazards associated with each class.

Health hazards

  1. Dangers from skin contact, inhalation, ingestion and radiation.

Conventions, regulations and recommendations

  1. General familiarization with the relevant requirements of chapters II-2 and VII of the 1974 SOLAS Convention and of Annex III of MARPOL 73/78, including its implementation through the IMDG Code.

Use of and familiarization with the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code

  1. General knowledge of the requirements of the IMDG Code concerning declaration, documentation, packing, labelling and placarding; freight container and vehicle packing; portable tanks, tank containers and road tank vehicles, and other transport units used for dangerous substances.
  2. Knowledge of identification, marking and labelling for stowage, securing, separation and segregation in different ship types mentioned in the IMDG Code.
  3. Safety of personnel, including safety equipment, measuring instruments, their use and practical application and the interpretation of results.

SHIPBOARD APPLICATION

Class 1 - Explosives

  1. The six hazard divisions and 13 compatibility groups; packagings and magazines used for carriage of explosives; structural serviceability of freight containers and vehicles; stowage provisions, including specific arrangements for on-deck and under-deck stowage; segregation from dangerous goods of other classes within class 1 and from non-dangerous goods; transport and stowage on passenger ships; suitability of cargo spaces; security precautions; precautions to be taken during loading and unloading.

Class 2 - Gases (compressed, liquefied, or dissolved under pressure), flammable, non-flammable, non-toxic and toxic

  1. Types of pressure vessels and portable tanks, including relief and closing devices used; stowage categories; general stowage precautions, including those for flammable and poisonous gases and gases which are marine pollutants.

Class 3 - Flammable liquids

  1. Packagings, tank containers, portable tanks and road tank vehicles; stowage categories, including the specific requirements for plastics receptacles; general stowage precautions, including those for marine pollutants; segregation requirements; precautions to be taken when carrying flammable liquids at elevated temperatures.

Class 4.1 - Flammable solids

Class 4.2 - Substances liable to spontaneous combustion

Class 4.3 - Substances which, in contact with water, emit flammable gases

  1. Types of packagings; carriage and stowage under controlled temperatures to prevent decomposition and possible explosion; stowage categories; general stowage precautions,including those applicable to self-reactive and related substances, desensitized explosives and marine pollutants; segregation requirements to prevent heating and ignition, the emission of poisonous or flammable gases and the formation of explosive mixtures.

Class 5.1 - Oxidizing substances

Class 5.2 - Organic peroxides

  1. Types of packagings; carriage and stowage under controlled temperatures to prevent decomposition and possible explosion; stowage categories; general stowage precautions, including those applicable to marine pollutants; segregation requirements to ensure separation from combustible material, from acids and heat sources to prevent fire, explosion and the formation of toxic gases; precautions to minimize friction and impact which can initiate decomposition.

Class 6.1 - Toxic substances

Class 6.2 - Infectious substances

  1. Types of packagings; stowage categories; general stowage precautions, including those applicable to toxic, flammable liquids and marine pollutants; segregation requirements, especially considering that the characteristic common to these substances is their ability to cause death or serious injury to human health; decontamination measures in the event of spillage.

Class 7 - Radioactive material

  1. Types of packagings; transport index in relation to stowage and segregation; stowage and segregation from persons, undeveloped photographic film and plates and foodstuffs; stowage categories; general stowage requirements; segregation requirements and separation distances; segregation from other dangerous goods.

Class 8 - Corrosive substances

  1. Types of packagings; stowage categories; general stowage precautions, including those applicable to corrosive, flammable liquids and marine pollutants; segregation requirements, especially considering that the characteristic common to these substances is their ability to cause severe damage to living tissue.

Class 9 - Miscellaneous dangerous substances and articles

  1. Examples of hazards, including marine pollution.

Safety precautions and emergency procedures

  1. Electrical safety in cargo spaces; precautions to be taken for entry into enclosed spaces that may contain oxygen-depleted, poisonous or flammable atmospheres; the possible effects of spillage or fire in shipments of substances of each class; consideration of events on deck or below deck; use of the IMO Emergency Response Procedures for Ships Carrying Dangerous Goods; emergency plans and procedures to be followed in case of incidents involving dangerous substances.

Medical first aid

  1. The IMO Medical First Aid Guide for Use in Accidents Involving Dangerous Goods (MFAG) and its use and application in association with other guides and medical advice by radio.

STCW Section B-V/d*

Guidance on application of the provisions of the STCW Convention to mobile offshore units (MOUs)

  1. The provisions of the STCW Convention apply to the maritime personnel of self-propelled MOUs proceeding on voyages.
  2. The provisions of the STCW Convention do not apply to non-self-propelled MOUs or to MOUs on station.
  3. When considering appropriate standards of training and certification when an MOU is on station, the country of registry should take account of relevant IMO recommendations. In particular, all maritime crew members on self-propelled MOUs and, where required, on other units should meet the requirements of the STCW Convention, as amended.
  4. Self-propelled MOUs proceeding on international voyages are required to carry safe manning documents.
  5. MOUs on station are subject to the national legislation of the coastal State in whose Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) they are operating. Such coastal States should also take account of relevant IMO recommendations and should not prescribe higher standards for MOUs registered in other countries than the standards applied to MOUs registered in that coastal State.
  6. All special personnel employed on board MOUs (whether or not self-propelled) should be provided with appropriate familiarization and basic training in accordance with relevant IMO recommendations.

STCW Section B-V/e*

Guidance regarding training and qualifications of masters and officers in charge of a navigational watch on board offshore supply vessels

  1. It is important that masters and officers involved in offshore supply operations should have relevant experience or training before assuming their duties on offshore supply vessels. The focus should be on onboard operational experience or a combination of operational experience and simulator training.
  2. Masters and officers should understand the unique manoeuvring and handling characteristics common to offshore supply vessels.
  3. Prior to performing offshore supply operations, the master and officers should:
    1. have knowledge of the offshore industry and the terms used in the various operations;
    2. understand the importance of maintaining a safe working distance at all times when working in an offshore location/installation;
    3. have knowledge of vessel manoeuvring and station-keeping under various weather conditions;
    4. understand the specific design parameters of the vessels; and
    5. understand the need to have unrestricted oversight and views of work areas.
  4. While on board an offshore supply vessel, the master and officers should:
    1. have knowledge of the handling characteristics and behaviour of vessels fitted with various propulsion arrangements; and
    2. be capable of operating the offshore supply vessel in close proximity to an offshore installation and other vessels.
  5. Masters should understand the need for other personnel on board who are involved in performing offshore supply operations to be familiarized with their duties.

Offshore supply vessels performing anchor-handling operations

  1. It is important that masters and officers in charge of a navigational watch on board offshore supply vessels involved in anchor-handling operations have relevant experience and training.
  2. Prior to performing anchor-handling operations, masters and officers in charge of a navigational watch should:
    1. be well informed of the ship’s handling characteristics in relation to anchor-handling, including, but not limited to:
      1. navigation and position-holding;
      2. ship-handling;
      3. thorough knowledge of the stability of offshore supply vessels, in particular the combination of low GZmax, low open deck and large external forces. Use of loading calculators and the conflict between a rigid and stiff ship and good work environment on deck. Potential reduction of stability from use of anti-rolling devices; and
      4. operations in hazardous oil-field areas, including locating any pipelines or other structures on the seabed in the area where anchors or other mooring equipment is likely to be used; and
    2. be made thoroughly familiar with the use of all instruments and systems fitted in the ship concerned and involved in anchor-handling, including their capabilities and limitations, including, but not limited to:
      1. use of various thrusters, conventional or azimuth propulsion;
      2. pickup, handling, heavy lifting, towing out, anchor-handling and laying of anchors for offshore rigs, barges and installations;
      3. towing of rigs, barges and other vessels;
      4. operation of lifting and towing winches with up to 600 metric tons bollard pull;
      5. detailed thorough knowledge of the basis of operation of towing- and anchor-handling winches; in particular, functions of load-limiting devices and release systems and associated equipment as towing pins and stoppers; and
      6. the significant difference between emergency release of towing hooks and winches.
  3. Masters and officers in charge of a navigational watch when in charge of anchor-handling should have sufficient and appropriate training and experience by having been supervised during a number of Rig-moves, as deemed appropriate by the Administration. Training may be supplemented by appropriate simulator training.

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Section B-V/f*

Guidance on the training and experience for personnel operating dynamic positioning systems



  1. Dynamic positioning is defined as the system whereby a self-propelled vessel’s position and heading is automatically controlled by using its own propulsion units.
  2. Personnel engaged in operating a Dynamic Positioning (DP) system should receive relevant training and practical experience. Theoretical elements of this training should enable Dynamic Positioning Operators (DPOs) to understand the operation of the DP system and its components. Knowledge, understanding and experience gained should enable personnel to operate vessels safely in DP, with due regard for safety of life at sea and protection of the marine environment.
  3. The content of training and experience should include coverage of the following components of a DP system:
    1. DP control station;
    2. power generation and management;
    3. propulsion units;
    4. position reference systems;
    5. heading reference systems;
    6. environmental reference systems; and
    7. external force reference systems, such as hawser tension gauges.
  4. Training and experience should cover the range of routine DP operations, as well as the handling of DP faults, failures, incidents and emergencies, to ensure that operations are continued or terminated safely. Training should not be limited to DPOs and DP masters only; other personnel on board, such as electro-technical and engineer officers, may require additional training and experience to ensure that they are able to carry out their duties on a DP vessel. Consideration should be given to conducting appropriate DP drills as a part of onboard training and experience. DPOs should be knowledgeable of the type and purpose of documentation associated with DP operations, such as operational manuals, Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEAs) and capability plots.
  5. All training should be given by properly qualified and suitably experienced personnel.
  6. Upon appointment to a vessel operating in DP mode, the master, DPOs and other DP-trained personnel should be familiarized with the specific equipment fitted on and the characteristics of the vessel. Particular consideration should be given to the nature of the work of the vessel and the importance of the DP system to this work.

* Note there are no corresponding regulations in the Convention or sections in part A of the Code for sections B-V/a, B-V/b, B-V/c, B-V/d, B-V/e, and B-V/f
**The relevant IMO Model Course(s) may be of assistance in the preparation of courses.

Disclaimer: For general information purpose only - please check with IMO STCW Convention for the latest requirements and accurate info

LAST UPDATED ON Mar 15, 2019

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